Engineering and Biomedical Science - E3004

Engineering and Biomedical Science

Bachelor degree (honours)/Bachelor degree

Eager to explore a career in biomedical engineering?  Consider a double degree in engineering and biomedical science.

Advances in biological sciences and demand for technological solutions are creating new opportunities for engineers. In the next 25 years, engineering will be transformed as it fuses with developments in biomedical science.

Monash University has pioneered this emerging field. Some examples include the Monash Vision Group's work on the bionic eye and our new 4D lung-imaging method. Join our scientists and engineers in developing the latest biomedical innovations and improving lives.

This course leads to two separate degrees. Depending upon your specialisation, you will be awarded one of:

  • the Bachelor of Chemical Engineering (Honours), or
  • the Bachelor of Civil Engineering (Honours), or
  • the Bachelor of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering (Honours), or
  • the Bachelor of Materials Engineering (Honours), or
  • the Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering (Honours),


and also

  • the Bachelor of Biomedical Science.

You will gain all the benefits of each degree course (see Bachelor of Engineering (Honours)/Bachelor of Biomedical Science) and be fully equipped to pursue a career in either or both in combination.

The course lets you to combine one of six engineering disciplines with aspects of anatomy, biochemistry, clinical medicine, epidemiology and preventative medicine, genetics, immunology, microbiology, pharmacology, physiology and psychology. This dual degree will give you the skills you need to  help solve challenging medical problems.

You will showcase your biomedical and engineering knowledge in a final project. Graduates can then choose from an abundance of rewarding and exciting career options here and overseas. You will be in demand from collaborative research centres as well as engineering, electronics, medical and pharmaceutical  companies worldwide.

This course requires students to complete a total of 420 hours of continuous professional development, in order to graduate. This professional development may be in the form of 12 weeks of relevant vacation employment or an equivalent combination of approved professional development and/or engineering employment, taken throughout the duration of the course. Students are required to submit a series of reflections on their experience, with particular reference to development of each of the key Engineers Australia Stage 1 competencies.

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At a glance

ATAR

94.5 Note 2017 clearly in ATAR
87.45 Note 2017 lowest ATAR offer

Subject prerequisites

English Maths Sciences / Other
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Course Details

Location
  • On-campus at Clayton: Full time & part time
Duration
  • 5 years (full time)
  • 10 years (part time)
Start date First Semester (February)
See course requirements

View details specific to degree:

Entry Requirements

You need to satisfy the following entrance requirements to be considered for entry to this course.

Minimum Entry Requirements

Qualifications

Equivalent Australian Year 12

Prerequisites

All applicants must satisfy the following prerequisites or their equivalents.

English Maths Sciences/Other
Australian VCE subjects Units 3 & 4: a study score of at least 35 in English (EAL) or 30 in English other than EAL Units 3 & 4: a study score of at least 25 in Mathematical Methods (any) Units 3 & 4: a study score of at least 25 in Chemistry
IB At least 5 in English SL or 4 in English HL or 6 in English B SL or 5 in English B HL At least 4 in Mathematics SL or or 3 in Mathematics HL At least 4 in Chemistry SL or 3 in Chemistry HL

Alternative qualifications and prerequisites

For other domestic and international qualification entry requirements and scores for this course based on your prior studies, use the study credit and admissions eligibility search.

English requirements

Applicants must also meet the English language requirements.

University entrance requirements

Minimum entrance requirements for admission to Monash University Australia.

Making the application

Future students

Semester one (February)

Applications for on campus studies should be made online through the Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre.

Semester two (July)

This course is not available for Second Semester (July) entry

For applications Direct to Monash

Apply directly to Monash with this course code: E3004

Current Monash students

You may apply to transfer from another Monash course. Transfers are a competitive process. You may apply mid-year for available courses however consideration will be given as to whether you will be able to follow your course progression.

Please note that if you apply for a course transfer, you should still enrol in your current course as if you were continuing so as not to jeopardise your enrolment in the Faculty if your transfer application is unsuccessful. More about Course Transfer...

Self assess for credit eligibility

Check for study credit using the "Credit search" link on the Credit for prior study page

Fees

Fees are subject to change annually.

Commonwealth supported place (CSP)

The average annual student contribution amount is:

A$9500

Note: see information on how average fee is calculated.

Fee assistance

As a Commonwealth supported student, you may be able to either:

Scholarships

We offer over 200 types of scholarships, valued at up to $70,000. Some scholarships offer one-off payments while others continue for the length of your course. Learn more about Monash Scholarships.

Other fees

The Student Services and Amenities Fee applies to some students each calendar year.

Double degree courses allow you to study towards two different degrees at the same time, and graduate with two separate qualifications. And because a required subject in one course can count as an elective in the other, our double degrees take two years less than if you studied for the two degrees separately.

The Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) is a specialist course that develops through four themes that combine to underpin engineering practice: Fundamentals and foundational skills, Design, Knowledge and applications, and Professional Practice.

A. Engineering fundamentals and foundational skills

These will develop your understanding of natural and physical sciences, mathematics, numerical analysis, statistics, and computer and information sciences that underpin all engineering disciplines.

B. Engineering design

This will develop the engineering techniques, tools and resources for the conduct, design and management of engineering design processes and projects, both in the industrial setting and in the development of research experiments.

C. Engineering knowledge and application

This will provide in-depth knowledge of the specific engineering methods of a branch of engineering, and will integrate the specific engineering methods and discipline knowledge into practice. You will develop skills to identify and apply knowledge of contextual factors impacting the engineering discipline. Additionally, your studies will focus on your understanding and application of the scope, principles, norms, accountabilities and bounds of contemporary engineering practice in your discipline.

D. Professional practice

This will develop your skills in readiness for the engineering workplace. You will develop skills in effective team membership and team leadership, the use and management of commercially relevant data, and the legal responsibilities of engineers. This study will integrate the theme 'Engineering knowledge and application' with your specialist field of engineering.

The Bachelor of Biomedical Science is a specialist course that provides an interdisciplinary approach to study of biomedical science, with five central themes: molecular and cellular biology, body systems, infection and immunity, disease and society, and diagnostic and research tools.  These themes are interwoven in units throughout the course.

A. Molecular and cellular biology

Through these studies you will learn how the cell functions and replicates itself in health and disease, particularly considering the structure of the cell and its evolution, the function of cells, DNA, genes and proteins, and the regulation of metabolism.

B. Body systems

This theme addresses the principles of major body systems. You will learn how cells come together to form tissues and organs and how they work together in the body to provide it with its metabolic needs and remove waste products. You will study how structure follows function; homeostasis; the nutritional and GI system; the neural system and senses; endocrine, reproductive and renal systems; and cardiovascular and respiratory systems.

C. Infection and Immunity

The focus of these studies is the functional immune system of multicellular organisms and the disease states that result from pathogen infection and from autoimmunity.  You will learn about molecular genetics and recombinant DNA (both important tools for the study of microbial disease and immunity), inflammation and disease, and infection and infection control.

D. Disease and society

In these studies you will learn about disease states that result from abnormal function in various body systems, including the cellular, genetic and molecular causes of the disease, with a focus on mechanisms of disease and patterns of disease and treatment. In studying the basis for human disease, you will also consider the societal and personal impacts of past, present and future diseases and the social, economic and environmental factors that are determinants of health.

E. Diagnostic and research tools

These studies address both the molecular and cellular tools, including specialist imaging techniques, that can be used to study and diagnose diseases.